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My Recipes-of-the-Week are featured here on my Home page. You can find 1000+ of my kitchen-tested recipes using the Recipes tab, watch nearly 100 Kitchen Encounters/WHVL-TV segments using the TV Videos tab, join the discussion about all of my creations using the Facebook tab, or Email your questions and comments directly to me--none go unanswered. "We are all in this food world together." ~Melanie

02/19/2019

~ Creamy & Chunky Chicken & Mushroom Chowder ~

IMG_8848Whether it be a quick-to-make brothy soup or a long-simmered thick stew, a steamy-hot cup or a whole damned bowl of either is my idea of the ideal take-a-break and sit-down-to-eat meal. Add a handful of cooked noodles or rice and I'm as happy as a clam.  Speaking of clams brings chunky chowder to mind, and, every time I make chowder, I ask the same question, "why don't I make this more often?"  I love everything about it, right down to the little crackers that get crumbled in.

6a0120a8551282970b019aff34d937970cChowder is a rich soup chocked full of chunky-chopped protein and vegetables. It's mostly associated with fish or seafood because it gets its name from the French word "chaudiere", which refers to the cauldron fishermen made their fresh stews in over open fires on the boat docks (with clam chowder being the most popular and most famous).  That said, chowder can be made with any meat or poultry too. Here in America, chowders are made two ways: New England-style, with cream and/or milk in the broth, and, Manhattan-style, with tomatoes added to the broth.  In the case of a well-made New England-style chowder, the broth should be rich, silky and slurpy -- not overly-thickened glop tasting of bland flour.

Once you drive South of New England, through the metropolitan areas of Boston or New York and Manhattan proper, and arrive here in the rural Northeast, you're more likely to find corn or chicken chowders on the menus of our eateries.  It's only natural.  The farther inland you go, access to fresh fish or seafood dwindles as the price skyrockets.  That said, our farms consist of vast fields of sweet corn, and, if they don't raise dairy cows, they own a poultry farm.  It's farm country.

IMG_87626  tablespoons olive oil (Note:  Chowder is traditionally started by frying bacon in the bottom of the pot.  The crisp bacon is removed, chopped, and returned to the soup near the end of the process and/or used as garnish.  The bacon drippings that remain are used to sauté the protein and/or vegetables.  Feel free to skip the olive oil and use bacon drippings.  That said, in this particular recipe, I do not.  For my taste, bacon overpowers its luscious flavor.)

2 pounds uncooked, trimmed of any fat, 1/2" diced boneless, skinless chicken thighs (chicken tenderloins may be substituted)

16-18  ounces medium-diced yellow or sweet onion (about 3 cups)

12-14  ounce peeled and 1/4"-thick sliced carrots (about 3 cups)

8-10  ounces diced celery (about 2 cups)

1 1/2  pounds thinly-sliced crimini or white button mushroom caps, no stems, or a combination of both

4-8  large garlic cloves, run through a press, about 3-4 tablespoons pressed garlic

6  tablespoons salted butter

6  tablespoons Wondra quick-mixing flour for sauce and gravy

4  cups chicken stock

2  cups cream + up to 1 cup whole milk (to achieve desired consistency)

2  tablespoons dried herbes de Provence (a mixture of rosemary, marjoram, thyme and savory)

3  pounds gold potatoes, peeled and 3/4" diced (about 6 cups)

freshly-ground sea salt and peppercorn blend, added as directed throughout recipe

minced, fresh parsley, for garnish

mini-saltine crackers, for accompaniment

IMG_8765 IMG_8765 IMG_8765 IMG_8765~Step 1.  In a 14", 8-quart chef's pan (or an 8-quart Dutch oven), place the olive oil. Add the diced chicken, onion, carrots and celery.  Season with sea salt and peppercorn blend (about 40 grinds salt and 50 grinds pepper). Adjust heat to medium-high and sauté, stirring almost constantly, until the chicken is just short of being cooked and the vegetables are softening, 8-10 minutes.

IMG_8776 IMG_8776 IMG_8776 IMG_8776 IMG_8776 IMG_8776 IMG_8776 IMG_8776~Step 2.  Sprinkle the garlic over the chicken and add the mushrooms to the pan.  Briefly stir to combine.  Season again with sea salt and peppercorn blend (about 40 grinds salt and 50 grinds pepper).  Continue to sauté over medium-high heat until the mushrooms have lost their volume and moisture and almost no liquid remains in bottom of pan, 25-30 additional minutes.

IMG_8795 IMG_8795 IMG_8795 IMG_8795~Step 3.  Adjust heat to medium-low.  Add butter to pan, followed by the flour and herbes de Provence.  Stir constantly until ingredients are thoroughly combined and mixture is thickened and steaming, about 1 minute.  Turn heat off just long enough to peel and dice potatoes as directed.

IMG_8804 IMG_8804 IMG_8804 IMG_8804 IMG_8804 IMG_8804 IMG_8804 IMG_8840~Step 4.  Add the chicken stock to pan, followed by the cream.  Thoroughly stir.  Add potatoes and adjust heat to medium- medium-high.  Bring to a gentle, steady simmer.  Continue to simmer, adjusting the heat as necessary to maintain a gentle simmer, stirring frequently, until potatoes are cooked through to their centers, 25-30 minutes.  Turn heat off and cover the pan.  Allow the mixture to steep, on the still warm stovetop, for 30-60 minutes, to give flavors time to marry.

Five Quarts Creamy & Chunky Chicken & Mushroom Chowder:

IMG_8847Serve steaming hot garnished w/parsley & mini-saltines:

IMG_8874Creamy & Chunky Chicken & Mushroom Chowder:  Recipe yields 5 quarts.

Special Equipment List:  cutting board; chef's knife; vegetable peeler; garlic press; kitchen scale (optional but recommended) 14", 8-quart chef's pan w/straight-deep sides & lid, or, 8-quart Dutch oven w/lid; large slotted spoon and/or spatula; soup ladle

IMG_8714Cook's Note:  I'm not gonna lie, I came up with this chowder recipe (today), because I had a package of boneless chicken thighs and a goodly amount of mushrooms leftover from my ~ Perfectly-Prepared Chicken and Mushroom Risotto ~ (which I made and posted over the Valentine's Day weekend). With a snowstorm happening in Happy Valley today, this chowder is going to be a warm and hearty, "winner, winner Wintertime dinner!"

"We are all in this food world together." ~ Melanie Preschutti

(Recipe, Commentary and Photos courtesy of Melanie's Kitchen/Copyright 2019)

02/17/2019

~ Perfectly-Prepared Chicken and Mushroom Risotto ~

IMG_8708Risotto is traditional Italian cooking at its best.  Risotto is more of a method than a recipe, and it requires respect.  There are no two ways to make risotto.  Make it right or it's not risotto.  Don't deviate from the method, don't take shortcuts and don't make substitutions.  Risotto cannot be rushed -- it requires patience.  It cannot be made in advance, it needs to be carefully watched, methodically stirred, and served immediately.  Risotto is done when it is done, and only the cook knows when it is done, but, when it is done right, it's a meal fit for a kind or a queen.

The word "risotto" is related to the Italian word "riso", or "rice".  Rice came to Northern Italy first, via Middle Easterners, and risotto, said to be the oldest and most common way of preparing rice, is Italy's contribution to rice cookery.  Typically served as a first- or appetizer-course, and primarily prepared in Northern Italy, Central and Southern Italy have claim to their own traditional recipes, using ingredients readily-available to their climate and landscape as well.  Without creating more controversy than is already "out there", it is this cook's opinion that it is not possible to cut a few corners and still come up with anything more than a presentable dish -- cheating breaks the spell.

IMG_8714There are no two ways to make risotto.  Make it right or it's not risotto.

IMG_8491Risotto is typically made in a heavy pot with round, sloping sides, which promote evaporation -- similar in shape to a saucier, the one in the photo is enameled cast-iron with a four-quart capacity. Risotto is traditionally stirred with a wooden spoon with a hole in the center, which allows the rice grains to flow freely during the constant stirring process.  Risotto requires a special, Italian-grown short-medium-grained, plump and polished rice with a high-starch content.  Arborio (are-bore-ee-oh) is the most readily available, with other choices being carnaroli (car-no-row-lee) and vialone nano (vee-a-low-na-no).  Because starch is the key, never rinse the rice before cooking.

IMG_8494While risotto can technically be made with rice and water, the dish will be tasteless, so, before making risotto, one must decide what kind to make (meat-, seafood-, poultry- or vegetable-based), and that requires a corresponding fully-seasoned and preferably homemade stock (meat, seafood, poultry or vegetable).  The general rule is: six cups stock to one pound risotto rice and the stock must be kept steaming hot (not simmering or boiling) throughout the cooking process to enable the rice to release its starch, which is what makes risotto creamy.  If the stock is boiling (too hot), the rice can be mushy.  If the stock it not steaming (too cold), the rice can seize and be gummy.

IMG_8535Once the stock has been prepared, what I refer to as "the add-ins", the smaller-than-bite-sized bits and morsels of food that typically get stirred into risotto at the end of the cooking process, must be cooked in some manner.  The add-ins, the meat, seafood, poultry or vegetables, while it's acceptable if they consist of small pieces or chards of proteins or vegetable from the stock, I much prefer to start with a raw protein and usually one fresh vegetable too.  I lightly-season them, then sauté them with a few fresh-pressed garlic cloves in a bit of olive oil.  A moist, succulent, nicely-seasoned protein in conjunction with a seasonal vegetable is add-in perfection.

IMG_8627When properly prepared, risotto has a rich, creamy texture, with every grain of rice being plain to see and having a hint of a bite -- rather than soft through to the center or mushy. Risotto begins by sautéing finely-diced onions in some olive oil in the bottom of the risotto pot (sometimes garlic is added too, although I prefer to add the garlic to my add-ins), until the onions are translucent and very, very, soft -- so the onions disappear into the finished dish. Next, the rice gets stirred in and cooked until every grain is coated in oil and ever-so-slightly toasted.  At that instant, a splash of white wine  goes in and the mixture is stirred until it has evaporated.

IMG_8689 2Next, the broth is added, in small increments, in a well-orchestrated manner, while the cook constantly and methodically stirs -- the rice is kept moving at all times.  As the rice absorbs  broth, more broth is added, and so on, until rice is cooked to the perfectly, slightly-chewy "to the tooth" texture (or, to slightly less than "to the tooth", at which time the add-ins get stirred in, which creates a heartier dish -- after that, more broth is added, until the rice reaches perfection).  During the last seconds, the dish is finished by stirring in pieces of cold butter and finely-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (which adds to the luxurious consistency and provides glistening eye appeal).

************

General rules of thumb for 12 cups risotto/12-16 starter-, or 6-8 main-dish servings:

Heat 6 cups stock to steaming for every 1-pound risotto rice being cooked.

Be sure to finely-dice the 1 1/2 cups onion & use 1/4 cup wine to deglaze pot. 

Plan on adding a minimum of 5 cups stock & needing up to 6 cups.

Approximately 3-3 1/2 cups of sautéed add-ins is ideal.

Finish w/4 tablespoons cubed butter & 6-8 tablespoons finely-grated Parmesan.

************

IMG_8726For the stock:

6 cups fully-seasoned steaming-hot chicken stock, your favorite recipe or mine

Note:  Be sure to taste and season whatever chicken stock or chicken stock recipe you are using prior to adding it to the rice.  Stock is "liquid gold" (the primary flavoring) to risotto:  the finished dish is only going to taste as good as the stock that got added to it tastes.  Risotto cannot be seasoned after-the-fact -- that's a fact.  If the stock is lacking salt or any other seasoning, the risotto will taste like any unseasoned rice would taste -- bland and boring.

************

IMG_8498For the chicken and mushroom add-ins to the risotto:

1-1 1/4 pound uncooked, trimmed of any fat, 1/2" diced boneless, skinless chicken thighs (chicken tenderloins may be substituted)

8  ounces thinly-sliced crimini or white button mushroom caps, no stems, or a combination of both

4-6  large garlic cloves, run through a press, about 2 tablespoons pressed garlic

freshly-ground sea salt and peppercorn blend

4  tablespoons olive oil

IMG_8499 IMG_8499 IMG_8499 IMG_8499~Step 1.  In a 3 1/2-quart chef's pan, place the olive oil. Add the diced chicken and lightly-season with sea salt and peppercorn blend (about 15 grinds salt and 25 grinds pepper). Adjust heat to medium-high and sauté until the chicken is just short of being cooked, through, 3-4 minutes.

IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510 IMG_8510~Step 2.  Sprinkle the garlic over the chicken and add the mushrooms to the pan.  Briefly stir to combine.  Lightly season with sea salt and peppercorn blend (about 10 grinds salt and 15 grinds pepper). Continue to sauté over medium-high heat until the mushrooms have lost all of their moisture and almost no liquid remains in bottom of pan, 4-6 minutes. Consistency is more important than the time it takes.  Remove from heat, cover and set aside.

************

IMG_8538For the risotto:

4  tablespoons olive oil

1 1/2  cups finely-diced onion

1  pound arborio, carnaroli, or, vialone nano rice

1/4  cup sweet white wine

4  tablespoons salted butter

6-8  tablespoons finely-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

6  cups chicken stock

3-3 1/2 cups chicken and mushroom "add-in" mixture (from above recipe)

IMG_8541 IMG_8546 IMG_8546 IMG_8546 IMG_8546 IMG_8546~Step 1.  Heat the olive oil in the risotto pot over medium heat.  Stir in the onion.  Cook, over medium- medium-high, stirring almost constantly with a large wooden spoon (Italians insist it be wooden), until onion is soft, tender, translucent and just beginning to brown, 8-10 minutes.  During this process, regulate the heat carefully, up or down, in order to keep the onions sautéing gently.  Stir constantly and do not try to rush it.

IMG_8564 IMG_8564 IMG_8564 IMG_8564 IMG_8564~Step 2.  Stir in the Arborio rice and continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the grains are coated with oil and the edges are ever-so-slightly toasted, about 2-3 minutes.  Add and stir in the wine and cook until the liquid has all evaporated, 20-30 seconds, stirring constantly.  This step goes very quickly.  Be prepared to start adding stock almost immediately.

IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580 IMG_8580~Step 3.  Ladle enough hot stock into pot to cover  rice, about 1 1/2 cups. On this first addition of stock, make certain the rice is fully covered. Adjust heat to a gentle, steady simmer and cook, stirring constantly, until all of the stock gets absorbed and you can see the bottom of the pot, about 3-4 minutes.  Once again, time is not as important as the end result.

IMG_8608 IMG_8608 IMG_8608 IMG_8608 IMG_8608 IMG_8608 IMG_8608 IMG_8620 IMG_8620 IMG_8620 IMG_8620 IMG_8628 IMG_8628 IMG_8628 IMG_8628 IMG_8628 IMG_8628 IMG_8642 IMG_8642 IMG_8642 IMG_8642 IMG_8642~Step 4.  Continue the process of adding stock, about 1 cup at a time, stirring constantly after each addition, until the rice has absorbed all of the liquid, about 3-4 minutes, three more times, for a total of 9-12 total minutes.  To this point in the risotto making process, a total of 4 1/2-5 cups of stock will have been added to the rice.

IMG_8654 IMG_8654 IMG_8654 IMG_8654 IMG_8654 IMG_8662 IMG_8662 IMG_8662 IMG_8662~Step 5.  Stir in the chicken mixture and get out a tasting spoon.  Adjust heat to a gentle, steady simmer and add additional stock in 1/4 cup increments, stirring 1-2 minutes after each addition, until rice is al dente or "to the tooth" and cooked to your liking.  I added, 3/4 cup of stock, in three 1/4 cup additions, tasting after each one, to get to desired doneness.

Note:  Experts all explain that risotto will not cook the same, or in the same amount of time every time, which is why risotto is more about understanding the method than having a recipe.  At the very end, the rice should be to your liking -- some like it crunch tender, others prefer it very soft.

IMG_8675 IMG_8675 IMG_8675 IMG_8675 IMG_8675 IMG_8675 IMG_8675 IMG_8675~Step 6.  Stir in the butter and grated cheese.  When the butter is melted and thoroughly incorporated, remove the pan from the heat, cover it, then, let it sit for 2-3 minutes.

Ladle into shallow bowls & garnish with freshly-ground sea salt, peppercorn blend & Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.

IMG_8724Perfectly-Prepared Chicken and Mushroom Risotto:  Recipe yields 12 cups/12-16 starter- or 6-8 main-dish servings. 

Special Equipment List:  2-quart saucepan; cutting board; chef's knife; garlic press; 3 1/2-quart chef's pan w/straight deep sides & lid; spatula; kitchen scale; 4-quart risotto pot/saucier w/lid; wooden risotto spoon or wooden spoon; 1 cup-sized ladle; 1/4 cup-sized ladle; tasting spoon 

IMG_8699Cook's Note:  I'm pretty sure I covered all the pertinent facts is this particular risotto post.  That said, should you be inclined, for an expanded, even more verbose explanation, I share everything I know about risotto, including my KE/WHVL-TV episode in my post ~ No two ways about it: Make it right or it's not Risotto ~.

"We are all in this food world together." ~ Melanie Preschutti

(Recipe, Commentary and Photos courtesy of Melanie's Kitchen/Copyright 2019)

02/15/2019

~ No two ways about it: Make it right or it's not Risotto ~

IMG_8705Risotto is traditional Italian cooking at its best.  Risotto is more of a method than a recipe, and it requires respect.  There are no two ways to make risotto.  Make it right or it's not risotto.  Don't deviate from the method, don't take shortcuts and don't make substitutions.  Risotto cannot be rushed -- it requires patience.  It cannot be made in advance, it needs to be carefully watched, methodically stirred, and served immediately.  Risotto is done when it is done, and only the cook knows when it is done, but, when it is done right, it's a meal fit for a kind or a queen.

Risotto is Italy's contribution to rice cookery.

IMG_8699The word "risotto" is related to the Italian word "riso", or "rice".  Rice came to Northern Italy first, via Middle Easterners, and risotto, said to be the oldest and most common way of preparing rice, is Italy's contribution to rice cookery.  Typically served as a first- or appetizer-course, and primarily prepared in Northern Italy, Central and Southern Italy have claim to their own traditional recipes, using ingredients readily-available to their climate and landscape as well.  Without creating more controversy than is already "out there", it is this cook's opinion that it is not possible to cut a few corners and still come up with anything more than a presentable dish -- cheating breaks the spell.

The pot, the spoon & the rice.

IMG_8491Risotto is typically made in a heavy pot with round, sloping sides, which promote evaporation -- similar in shape to a saucier, the one in the photo is enameled cast-iron with a four-quart capacity. Risotto is traditionally stirred with a wooden spoon with a hole in the center, which allows the rice grains to flow freely during the constant stirring process.  Risotto requires a special, Italian-grown short-medium- grained, plump and polished rice with a high-starch content.  Arborio (are-bore-ee-oh) is the most readily available, with other choices being carnaroli (car-no-row-lee) and vialone nano (vee-a-low-na-no).  Because starch is the key to risotto, never rinse the rice before cooking.

The stock -- meat, seafood, poultry or vegetable.

IMG_8494While risotto can technically be made with rice and water, the dish will be tasteless, so, before making risotto, one must decide what kind to make (meat-, seafood-, poultry- or vegetable-based), and that requires a corresponding fully-seasoned and preferably homemade stock (meat, seafood, poultry or vegetable).  The general rule is: six cups stock to one pound risotto rice and the stock must be kept steaming hot (not simmering or boiling) throughout the cooking process to enable the rice to release its starch, which is what makes risotto creamy.  If the stock is boiling (too hot), the rice will be mushy.  If the stock it not steaming (too cold), the rice will be gummy.

(Here are my recipes for:  beef, veal, shrimp, chicken and vegetable stock.  Once or twice a year, I make a big pot of each one, portion it into 2-quart sized, glass containers and freeze it. Having stock on-hand at all times makes homemade soup or risotto fast-food in my kitchen.)

The add-ins -- cooked morsels of food that go in at the end.

IMG_8535Once the stock has been prepared, what I refer to as "the add-ins", the smaller-than-bite-sized bits and morsels of food that typically get stirred into risotto at the end of the cooking process, must be cooked in some manner.  The add-ins, the meat, seafood, poultry or vegetables, while it's acceptable if they consist of small pieces or chards of proteins or vegetable from the stock, I much prefer to start with a raw protein and usually one fresh vegetable too.  I lightly-season them, then sauté them with a few fresh-pressed garlic cloves in a bit of olive oil.  A moist, succulent, nicely-seasoned protein in conjunction with a seasonal vegetable of choice is add-in perfection.

(Seasonally, I have a favorite combo of add-ins to risotto, and, I prepare them all via the same method.  Spring:  veal with asparagus tips.  Summer:  shrimp or lobster with sweet corn kernels. Fall:  chicken with mushrooms and/or peas.  Winter:  beef with mushrooms and/or carrots.)

The process -- risotto is time-consuming & complicated.

IMG_8627Yes and no.  Yes, risotto is time-consuming -- and you can't leave the stovetop, so, have your mise-en-place and pour a glass of wine or mix a cocktail before you start.  No, it is not complicated -- after you've made it a time or two and get "a feel" for it, you'll see and you'll agree.

When properly prepared, risotto has a rich, creamy texture, with every grain of rice being plain to see and having a hint of a bite -- rather than soft through to the center or mushy.  Risotto begins by sautéing finely-diced onions in some olive oil in the bottom of the risotto pot (sometimes garlic is added too, although I prefer to add the garlic to my add-ins), until the onions a translucent and very, very, soft -- so the onions disappear into the finished dish.  Once the onions are sautéed, the rice gets stirred in and cooked until every grain is coated in oil and ever-so-slightly toasted.  At that instant, a splash of white wine goes in and the mixture is stirred until it has evaporated.

Next, the broth is added, in small increments, in a well-orchestrated manner, while the cook constantly and methodically stirs the mixture -- the rice is kept moving at all times.  As the rice absorbs the broth in concert with some of the broth evaporating, more broth is added, and so on, until the rice is cooked to the perfectly, slightly-chewy "to the tooth" texture, or, to slightly less than the perfectly, slightly-chewy "to the tooth" texture, at which time the add-ins get stirred in, which creates a heartier dish -- after that, more broth is added, in smaller increments, until the rice reaches ideal doneness.  During the last seconds, the dish is finished off by stirring in a few pieces of cold butter some finely-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (which adds to the luxurious, creamy consistency and also provides glistening eye appeal).     

Throughout the process the heat is carefully regulated, up or down, in a saucepan to keep the stock steaming, and, in the risotto pot, to initially keep the pot hot enough to sauté the onions, then to keep the rice mixture hot enough to bubble and simmer, but not so hot as to scorch.

IMG_8689For the risotto & the finishing touches:

IMG_8538General rules of thumb for preparing 12 cups risotto:

Heat 6 cups stock to steaming for every 1-pound risotto rice being cooked.

Be sure to finely-dice the 1 1/2 cups onion & use 1/4 cup white wine to deglaze pot. 

Plan on adding a minimum of 5 cups stock & needing up to 6 cups.

Approximately 3-3 1/2 cups of sautéed add-ins is ideal.

Finish w/4 tablespoons cubed butter & 6-8 tablespoons finely-grated Parmesan.

My Perfectly-Prepared Chicken & Mushroom Risotto recipe:

IMG_8697"We are all in this food world together." ~ Melanie Preschutti

(Recipe, Commentary and Photos courtesy of Melanie's Kitchen/Copyright 2019)

02/13/2019

~ Milk-Chocolate-Lovers Nestlé-Crunch-Bar Cookies ~

IMG_8730The Nestlé Crunch Bar -- creamy milk chocolate chocked full of crunchy-crisped rice.  As one who has always preferred milk to dark chocolate, it, along with the Reese's peanut butter cup (milk chocolate and peanut butter) is at the top of my "favorite candy bars of my youth list".  As with several other favorites, for an adult activity, I prefer to chop up said candy bars and bake cookies with their bits and pieces -- I prefer a cookie to a candy bar and I adore a candy bar in a cookie.    

IMG_8417"Candy-bar cookies" and sweet treats made with my favorite candy bars are some of my favorite cookies to bake -- and what's not to love about a cookie that evokes childhood memories. Amongst all my other cookie recipes, it seems it's the candy-bar cookie recipes that get made the most often, and, get eaten almost as fast as I can fill the cookie jar -- a couple here, a couple there, and in a day or two, poof, they've disappeared.  Try my: Whoppers Milk-Chocolate Malted-Milk-Ball Cookies, Chewy Coconut & Crispy White-Kit-Kat Cookies, Over-the-Top Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Cookies, and, Chocolate & Peanut-Butter-Snickers Cookie Squares.  Today I'm adding my Nestlé Crunch Bar Cookies to KE. Long story short, it is an amped-up spin-off of  The Original Nestlé's Toll House Cookie recipe.

IMG_8456Milk chocolate + crisped rice = simply irresistible cookies: 

IMG_84292 1/4 + 2 tablespoons  cups all-purpose flour

1  teaspoon each:  baking powder and baking soda

1  teaspoon salt

1  cup salted butter, at room temperature, very soft (2 sticks)

3/4  cup granulated sugar

3/4  cup firmly-packed dark brown sugar

2  teaspoons pure chocolate extract

2  teaspoons pure vanilla extract

2  large eggs

18  ounces Nestlé Crunch Bars, chopped into morsel-sized 1/4" pieces

IMG_9622 IMG_9622 IMG_9622 IMG_9622 IMG_9622~Step 1.  In a small mixing bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside.  In a large bowl, place butter, sugar, brown sugar and vanilla extract.  On high-speed of hand-held mixer, beat until creamy, about 3 minutes.  Beat in eggs, about 1 minute.  Lower mixer speed and gradually beat in the flour until a smooth, sticky dough forms.

IMG_8432 IMG_8432 IMG_8432 IMG_8432 IMG_8432 IMG_8432~Step 2.  Using a large rubber spatula, add and fold in the chocolate pieces.  Using a 1 1/2" ice-cream scoop as a measure, drop cookies, well apart, by rounded tablespoonfuls onto each of 4, parchment-lined, 17 1/2" x 12 1/2" baking pans.

IMG_8454 IMG_8457~Step 3.  Bake, one-pan-at-a-time on center rack of 325º oven 13-15 minutes, until light-golden.  If you like cookies a bit chewy, do not bake until golden.  Remove from oven and use a small spatula to transfer to wire cooling rack to cool.

What could be better than eating your favorite candy bar?  

IMG_8463Eating a cookie made from a favorite candy bar.

IMG_8475Milk-Chocolate-Lovers Nestlé-Crunch-Bar Cookies:  Recipe yields 5-5 1/2 dozen cookies.

Special Equipment List:  cutting board; chef's knife; hand-held electric mixer; large rubber spatula; 4, 17 1/2" x 12 1/2" baking pans; parchment paper; 1 1/2" ice-cream scoop; wire cooling rack

6a0120a8551282970b01bb092fba3d970dCook's Note: Hold the chocolate candy and  everything you can put in a chocolate cookie to impress me. Don't sprinkle them with sea salt, slather them with caramel frosting or sandwich them together with buttercream.  It won't work.  As a foodie who lives in the blog world where everyone strives to make every recipe unique, in my kitchen, every once in a while, plain is the best flavor of all -- especially when ~ I'm in the Mood for:  Plain-Jane Chocolate Cookies ~. 

"We are all in this food world together." ~ Melanie Preschutti

(Recipe, Commentary and Photos courtesy of Melanie's Kitchen/Copyright 2019)